Juridical humanity esmeir samera. Juridical humanity : a colonial history (Book, 2012) [fentonia.com] 2019-01-28

Juridical humanity esmeir samera Rating: 5,3/10 287 reviews

(PDF) Juridical Humanity: A colonial history by Samera Esmeir (review)

juridical humanity esmeir samera

The archival turn has followed a long, protracted, and spiraled trajectory through the fields of history, historical anthropology, philosophy, and literary studies. That the archive has been the topic of such vibrant debate and disagreement outside of law but not within it is a problematic that informs this review. These legal reforms intersected with a new historical consciousness that distinguished freedom from force and the human from the pre-human, endowing modern law with the power to accomplish but never truly secure this transition. This was the rise of the 'human' as inscribed in modern positive law. Methodologically, therefore, the work accomplishes an impressive synthesis between historical investigation and ingenious interpretations of political and social theory. However, the Native is also dehumanized as nonhuman and is positioned alongside a long list of forces believed to comprise the domain of nature. Samera Esmeir was also the co-editor and cofounder of Adalah's Review, a sociolegal journal published in Arabic, Hebrew and English that focuses on the Palestinian minority in Israel.

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Samera Esmeir

juridical humanity esmeir samera

In the contemporary moment, amidst the proliferation of global claims to human rights and ongoing threats of revolution, how does the human continue to inform political and legal struggles in postcolonial Egypt and beyond? In Egypt, where positive law replaced the shari'a which was once a comprehensive legal system , a new association between the human and the law emerged, and that this association would prove to be the cornerstone of Egypt's colonization. Samera Esmeir offers a historical and theoretical account of the colonizing operations of modern law in Egypt. These legal reforms intersected with a new historical consciousness that distinguished freedom from force and the human from the pre-human, endowing modern law with the power to accomplish but never truly secure this transition. Esmeir clearly has this in mind. She has been also working on other research projects that focus on the contemporary Middle East, and specifically on questions of violence, war, and the security state. Juridical Humanity can sometimes read like the reproduction of a Western debate—the modern versus the anti-modern—in the context of colonial Egypt, rather than something that emerges from what is particular to Egypt. Esmeir addresses these difficult questions by tracing the historical emergence of the human as a modern legal phenomenon.

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Legal History Blog: New Release: Esmeir,

juridical humanity esmeir samera

A former lawyer, Samera Esmeir recived her Ph. This original contribution queries long-held assumptions about the entanglement of law, humanity, violence, and nature, and thereby develops a new reading of the history of colonialism. It is not entirely clear how Esmeir conceptualizes their differentiations if at all or how their distinctions informed the juridical production of humanity, as both surely do. Samera Esmeir offers a historical and theoretical account of the colonizing operations of modern law in Egypt. This article argues that the Gothic fictions of Jamila Gavin and Bali Rai offer a space in which to critically examine British history and so, its values in a way that is acutely relevant to these education contexts.

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Esmeir, Samera

juridical humanity esmeir samera

Investigating the law, both on the books and in practice, she underscores the centrality of the 'human' to Egyptian legal and colonial history and argues that the production of 'juridical humanity' was a constitutive force of colonial rule and subjugation. Samera Esmeir offers a historical and theoretical account of the colonizing operations of modern law in Egypt. Indeed, in Juridical Humanity, there seems to be a curious slipperiness between the inhuman and nonhuman. She maintains an interest in legal history and its rhetoric and is working on two small research projects. The book draws on fascinating case studies of the period the formation of animal rights groups, the investigation of murder on estates in order to make its point, but in the end, it is nearly so dense as to obscure the messages Esmeir cares most about. It deserves to be widely read by everyone interested in the Middle East.

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Esmeir, Samera

juridical humanity esmeir samera

This book helps the reader to formulate questions about the history of law and society in the Middle East that have not been raised in this way before. This article focuses on Badin, North Carolina, a segregated aluminum company town established in the early 1900s and site of a current environmental justice struggle. In colonial Egypt, the state introduced legal reforms that claimed to liberate Egyptians from the inhumanity of pre-colonial rule and elevate them to the status of human beings. This species and status of the human, as Esmeir conceives it, is articulated dialectically. This paper reads the U. These legal reforms intersected with a new historical consciousness that distinguished freedom from force and the human from the pre-human, endowing modern law with the power to accomplish but neve In colonial Egypt, the state introduced legal reforms that claimed to liberate Egyptians from the inhumanity of pre-colonial rule and elevate them to the status of human beings.

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Legal History Blog: New Release: Esmeir,

juridical humanity esmeir samera

Congratulations to , Humanity editorial board member, on the publication of her new book,. Although modern law was to replace the despotism and violence of coloniality, including violence associated with the Ottoman-Islamic legal tradition, Esmeir compellingly demonstrates that through the quest for humanity, modern law produced and justified its own violence. At other times, she suggests that nineteenth and early twentieth century Egyptians made arguments that mirrored—or that could unproblematically be set in dialogue with—the writings of Western legal thinkers working in entirely different contexts. For this, we must turn briefly to Fanon. Throughout the book, the centrality and significance of the inhuman is clear.

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Colonizing Humanity

juridical humanity esmeir samera

These legal reforms intersected with a new historical consciousness that distinguished freedom from force and the human from the pre-human, endowing modern law with the power to accomplish but never truly secure this transition. Juridical Humanity is an innovative tool for those working in legal and postcolonial theory and represents a major leap forward in postcolonial thinking. Investigating the law, both on the books and in practice, she underscores the centrality of the 'human' to Egyptian legal and colonial history and argues that the production of 'juridical humanity' was a constitutive force of colonial rule and subjugation. What is the relationship between law, violence and the colonial? This original contribution queries long-held assumptions about the entanglement of law, humanity, violence, and nature, and thereby develops a new reading of the history of colonialism. As Esmeir notes, it creates an opening for new inquiries into how the Egyptian subjects of juridical humanity lived in relation to this legal order, into alternative configurations of humanity, and into the link between the human, the law, and violence.

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Juridical Humanity: A Colonial History

juridical humanity esmeir samera

The human was to be constituted by the rule of the law, and risked disappearance if the body of the law broke down. Law and legal studies, by contrast, have had curiously little to say on the subject. In colonial Egypt, the state introduced legal reforms that claimed to liberate Egyptians from the inhumanity of pre-colonial rule and elevate them to the status of human beings. It is an intensely creative and also a vexing book. This affective and materialist inventory illustrates how race and waste intertwined in Badin to make aluminum vital and valuable. It deserves to be widely read by everyone interested in the Middle East.

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