Logon script run exe as administrator. A self elevating PowerShell script 2019-03-06

Logon script run exe as administrator Rating: 5,7/10 313 reviews

[SOLVED] Running Batch as admin through Group Policy

logon script run exe as administrator

I got around this by starting it with a batch file instead of of a script. You might also, as a way of courtesy , not tell your parents what happened to the admin password. If I your dad has admin rights to the laptop then If I ran the runas command I could use my credentials to install or run something with admin right on your profile. Well, after zs474's answer, there is a way, but not through normal methods. First of all, do the following to change the admin password. Issue 1 running inside a function has the scope of the function. The users have local admin access and only need to right-click and run.

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[SOLVED] Running Batch as admin through Group Policy

logon script run exe as administrator

This code should work for anybody for the most part at the top of any script file needing elevation with any Param statement as the very first lines in the script or possibly on line 5 just after the code block title. This command enables one to run a command in the context of another user account. In the name of security, these scripts stopped running elevated. How can I fix this? These scripts save me time because the user can run them without much effort. This depends on what your doing but I had a hta i wanted to run in 64 bit but it defaults to the 32 bit version everytime. It does work when I right-click run as admin but when I go to properties and check run as admin, it doesn't work. All this so that I can just do what I did before? I have a suspicion that when I run Wow.

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Running .exe as admin via batch script?

logon script run exe as administrator

Looking through the event viewer group policy and task scheduler are showing as successfully run but the bitlocker details never show in Active Directory. After password validation, registry editor will be opened with the administrator account credentials. So, we are safer now? This breaks my solution of passing arguments, and I've realised that it is not completely correct, so I made some modifications to make it work no matter which arguments are passed to the script. Thanks, D Why would you need to copy shortcuts to the all users or Public desktop in a logon script? You would need a different program for what you are trying to do. There are programs, like SysInternal's Process Explorer and ProcMon, or BitSum's Process Lasso, that will show you what it opened for apps and what they are using. One option is to switch user and login as administrator.

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Using Script To Run .hta File

logon script run exe as administrator

Apart from physically opening cmd prompt in Admin mode and entering the bat file name, I don't think that it is possible. Maybe the only option is to run the batch file as admin directly? Path Issue 2 is running a script with a space in the filename. I have only one user 'rakesh' and that user is the Administrator. Possible reasons are blank passwords not allowed, logon hour restrictions, or a policy restriction has been enforced. . Now, my questions… I usually like to comment my code, especially when doing stuff that is hard to interpret for a human.

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[SOLVED] Running Batch as admin through Group Policy

logon script run exe as administrator

I have discovered one issue though, and also have a few questions. I have an issue with a game that seems to function differently when I run it as Admin vs running it normally. The Administrator powershell windows was opened after running the cmdlets Start-Process powershell. You might want to look at it another way. But as I'm reading it, the op wants to click a batch file and it will run in cmd prompt in administrator mode. I know this has been answered, but here are a few questions for you: 1. Okay, this is not actually a virtualization related post — but is a purely about PowerShell.

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A self elevating PowerShell script

logon script run exe as administrator

The only issue we are running into is with Trend Micro Office Scan. I had the same problem as Mark Hicks, and I found a way to keep the current working directory in the elevated powershell. The user did not get any prompts. I was experimenting with a Show parameter with a default of 0. So you have to have the administrator password or a users password that has admin rights to run this. I'm tweaking the startup script that launches based off of a user profile. I apologize if I wasn't clear on explaining the problem.

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Using a PowerShell script to run as a different user & elevate the process.

logon script run exe as administrator

Is there any way to do this with a single Runas command from the Run window WinKey+R without using a batch file? The issue we are having is that power users do not have the privlages to make changes to the local computer. Instead, you can do the same by simply using runas command. Anyone have a solution to this problem? The issue is when I run Wow. My scripts use the script directory to locate other scripts and a log folder. Cheers, Ben Great piece of code! Kind Regards Rash You can run the bat file directly or the powershell script. I was looking for a way to run the logon script as a administrator without being prompted to enter the admin password, or any other work around for this, with the user being in the power users group.

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(Solved)

logon script run exe as administrator

The value is 1 when it is restarted. Any of these would tell you files opened and some might have full paths. Administrator of your system might have disabled users to login from command prompt. I thought maybe there would be a way to do this using Runas, but have not succeeded yet. Run a batch file as administrator To run a batch file as administrator of the computer, you need to mention the path of the batch file in the place of command in the runas syntax. If I log in as a end user and run as an administrator it works without issue. I think your not understanding the command at all.

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